Idra and Leo’s seder

Idra, Leo, Aimee and Kristin organized and prepared a wonderful Tuesday night seder this past week.  Here is a shot of the table toward the beginning of the meal:

 
Idra and Leo’s seder, originally uploaded by Brockenbrough Photos.In attendance:

Idra and Leo’s seder, originally uploaded by Brockenbrough Photos.

The Seder plate:

Idra and Leo’s seder, originally uploaded by Brockenbrough Photos.

Do not adjust your screen.  Do not wipe you eyes.  That is indeed an orange you see on the seder plate.  According to one homophobic-misogynistic rabbi, queers and women would be accepted fully into Judaism when oranges were on the seder plate.  Meaning: never.  So feminists have revived this reference and placed an orange to symbolize the inclusion of different sexual orientations and women into Judaism.   

The food at the seder was amazing!  And, this being Food City Bytes’ first seder, some was completely new.

Idra made some really delicious meat kugel as well as ratatouille.  There was also a beautiful wooden serving plate of perfectly cooked asparagus, some brussel sprouts and also homemade charoset.  Charoset is, in the European of Ashkenazi tradition, typically prepared with nuts (in this case walnuts), apples, cinnamon and sweet wine (or honey).  These ingredients are meant to conjure up the atributes of the Jewish people themselves according to King Solomon in the Song of Songs.

Typically, charoset would look like this: 

charoset, originally uploaded by Brockenbrough Photos.

  Aimee, in addition to incorporating the feminist symbolism into the traditional seder, brought fresh gefilte fish with carrots (which I actually really liked despite Aimee’s numerous warnings….The gefilte fish tasted like one of the shrimp noodles dim sum dishes at the Chinatown dim sum place on Mott Street.  yum!

Idra and Leo’s seder, originally uploaded by Brockenbrough Photos.

We went through the Hagadah reading about the 4 sons and singing.  Part is read before you have the meal and part after you have eaten.

And just before you start the meal, we read the parts about the various plagues that afflicted the Jewish people……including the plague of frogs!…….

The beginning of the plagues:


IMG_3102, originally uploaded by Brockenbrough Photos.

………a plague of frogs ravished the land!  ….and air, and chairs, and matzah ball soup!   And the parsley was attacked by airborne frogs in festive colors.

Then, in fear for his life in the midst of the plagues, Leo turned against his fellow man (and dinner guest):

Idra and Leo’s seder, originally uploaded by Brockenbrough Photos.

Then his fellow man turned his finger toward the first born child and decreed, “though shalt be slaid.”  Terror and fright ensued as the dashingly dressed in pink first born darted off scene in a desparate attempt to escape this plague:

Idra and Leo’s seder, originally uploaded by Brockenbrough Photos.

Remarkably, some seder attendees did not seem to be affected by the plagues.

“Hey, check it out man…we did not get slayed by no plague! We is fine!”:

Idra and Leo’s seder, originally uploaded by Brockenbrough Photos.

 Definitely keeping it real at the seder.

Later there were the plagues of darkness (lights off, shades on), wild beasts, botulism and famine.  And the night was ravaged!  No, in truth it was great fun and being my first seder, I had a wonderful initiation and hope to attend many more seders in the future.

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Filed under Cooking, Food, Holidays, New York City

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